12 Factors

#DevOps

Great Resource. https://12factor.net/

The Twelve Factors

I. Codebase

One codebase tracked in revision control, many deploys

II. Dependencies

Explicitly declare and isolate dependencies

III. Config

Store config in the environment

IV. Backing services

Treat backing services as attached resources

V. Build, release, run

Strictly separate build and run stages

VI. Processes

Execute the app as one or more stateless processes

VII. Port binding

Export services via port binding

VIII. Concurrency

Scale out via the process model

IX. Disposability

Maximize robustness with fast startup and graceful shutdown

X. Dev/prod parity

Keep development, staging, and production as similar as possible

XI. Logs

Treat logs as event streams

XII. Admin processes

Run admin/management tasks as one-off processes

Introduction

In the modern era, software is commonly delivered as a service: called web apps, or software-as-a-service. The twelve-factor app is a methodology for building software-as-a-service apps that:

  • Use declarative formats for setup automation, to minimize time and cost for new developers joining the project;
  • Have a clean contract with the underlying operating system, offering maximum portability between execution environments;
  • Are suitable for deployment on modern cloud platforms, obviating the need for servers and systems administration;
  • Minimize divergence between development and production, enabling continuous deployment for maximum agility;
  • And can scale up without significant changes to tooling, architecture, or development practices.

The twelve-factor methodology can be applied to apps written in any programming language, and which use any combination of backing services (database, queue, memory cache, etc).

Background

The contributors to this document have been directly involved in the development and deployment of hundreds of apps, and indirectly witnessed the development, operation, and scaling of hundreds of thousands of apps via our work on the Herokuplatform.

This document synthesizes all of our experience and observations on a wide variety of software-as-a-service apps in the wild. It is a triangulation on ideal practices for app development, paying particular attention to the dynamics of the organic growth of an app over time, the dynamics of collaboration between developers working on the app’s codebase, and avoiding the cost of software erosion.

Our motivation is to raise awareness of some systemic problems we’ve seen in modern application development, to provide a shared vocabulary for discussing those problems, and to offer a set of broad conceptual solutions to those problems with accompanying terminology. The format is inspired by Martin Fowler’s books Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture and Refactoring.

Who should read this document?

Any developer building applications which run as a service. Ops engineers who deploy or manage such applications.

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Platform Cooperatives

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Platform_cooperative

A platform cooperative, or platform co-op, is a cooperatively-owned, democratically-governed business that uses a protocol, website or mobile app to facilitate the sale of goods and services. Platform cooperatives are an alternative to venture capital funded platforms insofar as they are owned and governed by those who depend on them most—workers, users, and other relevant stakeholders. Proponents of platform cooperativism claim that, by ensuring the financial and social value of a platform circulate among these participants, platform cooperatives will bring about a more equitable and fair digitally-mediated economy in contrast with the extractive models of corporate intermediaries. Platform cooperatives differ from traditional cooperatives not only due to their use of digital technologies, but also by their contribution to the commons for the purpose of fostering an equitable social and economic landscape.

Platform cooperativism draws upon other attempts at digital disintermediation, including the peer-to-peer production movement, led by Michel Bauwens and the P2P Foundation,[1] which advocates for “new kinds of democratic and economic participation”[2] that rest “upon the free participation of equal partners, engaged in the production of common resources,” as well as the radically-distributed, non-market mechanisms of networked peer-production promoted by Yochai Benkler.[3] Marjorie Kelly’s book Owning Our Future contributed the distinction between democratic and extractive ownership design to this discussion.[4]

9 Working Examples of Platform Cooperatives

https://civic.mit.edu/blog/natematias/9-working-examples-of-platform-cooperatives

What is a platform co-op?

Just like traditional co-ops, platform co-ops are organisations that are owned and managed by their members. While traditional co-ops are normally based around a physical community of members, platform…

(continues at the link above.)
A two day conference on the collaborative economy

A two day conference on the collaborative economy

The conference happened on February 16-17 2017 at Goldsmiths, University of London

Platform Cooperativism
About
Directory
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About

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The Internet is slipping out of ordinary users’ control. Internet technologies are transforming our workplaces, relationships, and societies. Companies like Uber, Amazon, and Facebook are capturing vital sectors of the economy such as transportation and phenomena like search and social networking. All of us who rely on the Internet have virtually no control over the platforms that affect and inform us on a daily basis.

http://platformcoop.newschool.edu/

Platform Cooperativism Consortium (PCC)
The PCC supports the cooperative platform economy through research, advocacy, education, co-design, legal advice, application development, the documentation of best practices, the coordination of funding, and events.

11 Platform Cooperatives Creating a Real Sharing Economy
An upcoming event related to Platform Cooperatives as agents of Change.

http://wiki.p2pfoundation.net/Peer_Production_License

Co-operative Business Models for Sustainable Platform Enterprise

Is how we view establishing a new creative content maker’s platform.

It starts with the idea that you are able to tag your own creations on your own physical hardware or authorized “agent” that will operate on your behalf and retain on-going record of use of your content.

https://open.coop/2016/06/23/not-a-co-op-not-a-platform-co-op/

https://databigandsmall.com/2017/03/10/a-cooperative-approach-to-platforms/

I know that there is a need because I live in a Cooperative Housing Community and it works. I believe in the principles.

.dec